Monday, 18 September 2017

Camo & Plaid Pattern Mix Autumnal Outfit #iwillwearwhatilike

Super casual autumnal pattern mix: Camo jacket \ check plaid shirt \ cream peg pants trousers \ white Adidas Stan Smiths | Not Dressed As Lamb, over 40 style

I'm back from my week's holiday in Cornwall, and for today's #iwillwearwhatilike post I thought I'd show you my super casual, camo and plaid pattern mix outfit that became my "uniform" of sorts during our week away.

For any of you that aren't familiar with the British weather, it can be changeable (and erratic, and unpredictable)... at best. This time last year the UK was basking in the hottest September temperatures since records began (something like 34°C I think). THIS year... not so much! However, Cornwall is ALWAYS beautiful, even in the wind and rain. But there was a lot of sunshine between the showers and we did absolutely nothing, to some extent, so it was perfect in terms of a break for all three of us.

We of course took Riley with us, and despite being an old boy he loved climbing the cliff tops and walking on the beach (we rented a ground floor apartment right on the beach at St Agnes and it was lovely). We've been to Cornwall twice before in the last five years so we've done a lot of the sightseeing, so all we did this time was walk the dog, have pub lunches and relax on the sofa reading and napping.

I set my Inbox to Out of Office (and not back till the 18th), and apart from one post that was inspired by an iffy comment I received in the week I didn't do any serious blogging, just a little Instagramming here and there.

And that, dear readers, is what you call pure bliss.

I'M BACK AT HOME NOW LAMENTING THE END OF SUMMER AS I SIT HERE WONDERING WHERE MY FINGERLESS GLOVES AND SHEEPSKIN BOOTS ARE.

I'm back at home now lamenting the end of summer as I sit here wondering where my fingerless gloves and sheepskin boots are. I thoroughly recommend a total shutdown from work with a week away at least once a year if you can. Holidays - especially ones where you pack in lots of sightseeing and excursions - can be pretty tiring. But a week of effectively doing nothing was just wonderful.

Anyway, onto the outfit - super casual, and hopefully something to inspire the pattern mix-lovers among you...!
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Friday, 15 September 2017

When Readers' Comments DO Hurt My Feelings #SaturdayShareLinkUp

When Readers' Comments DO Hurt | Not Dressed As Lamb

As many of you know I've received my fair share of trolling - nothing major, but stuff that would seriously hurt the feelings of someone who's quite sensitive. Personally, I don't really give two hoots about what people think about what I wear as many of you know (and, thankfully, you share the same sentiment about yourselves)!

I do, however, get cross about people criticising others for absolutely no reason. It's unnecessary, hurtful and encourages others to do the same (and to do worse). And I'll defend others to the hilt when it comes to women putting other women down - there's no room for it in my space of the blogosphere.

On a similar-but-slightly-different note, this week I received a comment from a regular reader that really upset me. For starters, it was probably something I didn't need to know (in the same way that I don't ask for critiques of my outfits, I didn't ask for this opinion). Secondly, it just didn't make sense - the comments were somewhat contradictory.

The comment was:

"I don't know if you want any feedback on this [I didn't ask in this instance, this comment came out of the blue] but personally I'm not keen on the blog posts that feature collaborations with brands. I appreciate that you are trying to make a living but I don't like the commercialism involved. I do still enjoy seeing your personal style, reading your musings and checking out your other blogger recommendations so I'll just opt out of reading the collaborative/sponsored posts (it's easy as you do declare them). The I Will Wear What I Like link up is still one of my favourites."

To cut a long story short: That comment hurt. On so many levels. To me, that comment is basically saying, "I don't like the commercialism of your sponsored posts, whether they're well-written or not. So I'm just going to boycott them full stop."

The contradiction

Her whole reasoning was contradictory because the highest proportion of my sponsored posts are also personal style posts, yet she said she would continue to read those (I'm confused). I don't hide sponsored content - the very first thing you see on any sponsored post of mine (after the first image) is a banner that reads "SPONSORED CONTENT" (see this as an example), with full explanatory disclosure at the end of the post.

She also said the #iwillwearwhatilike posts are one of her favourites - but as those are always outfit posts then they, too, may be sponsored (as was the post from last week). Umm... so is she going to pick and choose which #iwillwearwhatilike posts to read and which ones she won't based on whether I collaborated with a brand each time? Apart from the disclosure about the posts being sponsored, there is NO difference in the way I write/approach them. Of course I will mention about working with the brand, but it doesn't affect the way I write or what I write about as a general rule.

To give you an example, here are three posts I wrote this year.

- One is sponsored, where the brand paid me to write whatever I wanted on a pre-agreed theme (that I suggested).
- One is written on a pre-agreed theme (that I suggested) but with gifted items only. It was not sponsored because I did not receive any extra payment.
- One was not in any way sponsored (meaning the brand had nothing to do with it whatsoever) and I bought the clothes myself.

Can you, dear reader, say one was "commercialised" had it not been for the disclosure, and what does that make the one with gifting only? Decide for yourself...


As far as I'm concerned my sponsored posts are well-written. The overall quality is no less and the content is no less interesting than any non-sponsored post. Or one with gifting only. As I explained when I first went full-time with the blog four years ago, I don't write my posts any differently whether they are sponsored or not. I received a really positive response to that post - my readers were truly happy for me, and since writing a post explaining to distrusting readers why not all sponsored posts are bad, it seems that most of my readers really are supportive of what I do to make a living and - most importantly - how I do it.

I approach all sponsored posts in the same way as regular posts: With honest thoughts and opinions. With the same level of care, keeping both what my readers want to read in mind and what the brand has asked me to talk about.

Plus, I don't consider them as "commercialised".

Why my posts are sponsored, not commercials

In its truest sense, commercialised means "prepared, done, or acting with sole or chief emphasis on salability, profit, or success". My collaborative posts are written for my readers to read and enjoy (and hopefully gain some sort of insight, inspiration or usefulness), not with the sole intention to sell stuff*. If they were I wouldn't even bother writing them, I'd simply publish pre-written content from the brand.

A commercial is an ad, and a post (whether blog, Instagram, Facebook, etc.) is an ad if the brand has control over what you write. Otherwise, if they commission you to write something and you are simply working to a brief (and in most instances I create the brief myself), then it is sponsored.

My posts are not ads. Therefore they are not, by definition, commercialised. They are first and foremost written to offer some sort of insight, inspiration or usefulness, not simply to sell, sell, sell. Surely the posts where I'm giving examples of AW17 pieces to buy based on past autumnal outfits of mine are more in the "hard sell" arena? Those posts aren't sponsored or collaborations. They do, however, have affiliate links, where I may make a small commission if my readers click through and buy. Will she be boycotting those too, I wonder...?

*Usually brands collaborate with bloggers with the intention of raising awareness, increasing their visibility and the association that comes with working with a particular influencer. Any brand that thinks their sales are going to rocket as a result of collaborating once with a blogger (unless you're Chiara Ferragni or Nicole Warne, which I am not) is sorely deluded about how marketing works.

What I do and don't do

To make things clear: I do not publish pre-written content, ever. It's stated in my Work With Me page that I don't do that. As far as I'm concerned, that's just advertising and doesn't belong in a blog post - not mine, anyway. My blog is a personal blog and it shall stay that way.

When I do write and publish sponsored posts, what you read is 100% my own work and 100% my own opinion. To prove it, I recently took down a post that I wrote with my own point of view, but the brand wanted me to change it to something they wanted more control over content and opinion-wise. We came to the mutual decision to take it down - I don't (and won't) work that way.

I have a rule that I stick to with the percentage of sponsored content that I produce: I stick to no more than 25% of my total output. In other words, I do not publish more than one sponsored post a week as I usually post four times a week. Sometimes there are none in a week, but that's my maximum (and a recommend industry guideline).

When it comes to the actual content of my sponsored posts, some may say that I'm gushing over a brand - if I choose to work with a brand I truly love and believe in and they send me products that I love, of COURSE I'm going to gush about them. There may be some bloggers who feign love for a product or a brand simply for the money, but I'm not one of them. I've turned down plenty of offers of (paid) work because I either didn't have anything to say about the brand/product, or I didn't support, love or believe in the brand/product.

When readers resent bloggers making money

The comment about "I appreciate that you are trying to make a living" is the one that grates the most.

I'm not "trying" to make a living. I AM making a living. I am making a living doing something that I love. I turned my hobby into my career, and I'm proud of myself for doing that and now running my own business.

I'm sure that most people would choose to turn their hobby into their career if they could. There are many, many professions where people get paid to do something they love, from artists to actors, from doctors to tree surgeons, from dog trainers to decorators.

I no longer consider myself "lucky" to be doing something I love as a career. I've been working damn hard for the past six years to make this blog into a business - despite that not being the intention at the beginning - and about 90% of what I have produced over the years has been free content for my readers. Granted, I have maybe had a little luck here and there along the way, but it came my way because of the hours I've put in.

I MEAN, HOW DARE BLOGGERS PRODUCE ALL THAT FREE CONTENT FOR READERS AND THEN HAVE THE CHEEK TO MAKE A FEW PENNIES OUT OF WHAT THEY CLICK THROUGH AND BUY, AT NO COST TO THEM?

For a little while now there seems to have been a bit of a backlash about bloggers who monetise their content, and there have been discussions in various online forums and social media about boycotting bloggers who monetise their platforms. I even heard that on that heinous platform Mumsnet there was a thread discussing bloggers' affiliate links and that they were warning each other not to click on those links and buy, because Did you know bloggers make commission out of those links?!

I mean, how DARE bloggers produce all that free content for readers and then have the cheek to make a few pennies out of what they click through and buy, at no cost to them?

Whilst this is a slightly different tangent to what my reader was talking about, it's all in the same ball park as far as I'm concerned: Women resenting other women making a success out of something.

So there you go - a reader hurt my feelings. Criticise my outfits all you like, it's water off a duck's back to me. But tell me that my content, the stuff that I slog over until 1am every morning 5-6 days a week is not worth reading because I've found a way to pay the bills with it, IS hurtful.

If I didn't think readers would enjoy my sponsored posts or find them interesting, I'd be too ashamed to publish them, it's as simple as that. I get that I won't please everyone all of the time. But unjustified boycotting for a reason that has nothing to do with whether or not something is to someone's taste or interests (or to my quality of output), now that's a punch in the gut.

WHAT ARE YOUR OPINIONS ABOUT BLOGGERS WORKING FOR MONEY? DO YOU SEE A DIFFERENCE IN MY SPONSORED POSTS? TELL ME IN THE COMMENTS OR TWEET ME @NOTLAMB!

Not Dressed As Lamb - CLICK HERE to receive posts by email

When Readers' Comments DO Hurt | Not Dressed As Lamb
So all that's left to say is - I've shared my thoughts/stories/tuppence-worth this week, now it's time to share yours... LET'S GET THIS [LINK UP] PARTY STARTED!

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Thank you for joining the #SaturdayShareLinkUp! Designed to allow you to share anything you like on ANY topic, it goes live every Friday at around 8pm UK time and will stay open for a week. You can share blog posts or Instagram posts, old posts or new posts, and link up as many as you like.

PLEASE be kind and leave a link somewhere on your post, and share your post using the hashtag #SaturdayShareLinkUp - if you tweet your link with the hashtag and tag me in @notlamb I'll even retweet it to my followers for you :)

A hot tip for linking up:

Use clear, bright images (crop in close if necessary) and add a relevant, descriptive title (you've got 75 characters to use). These sorts of thumbnails and text always get the most clicks, so don't waste the opportunity to increase traffic and engagement on your best work!



Catherine


Linking up to: Brilliant Blog Posts, Fake It Until You Make It
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Wednesday, 13 September 2017

My Favourite Autumn Outfits (With AW17 Shopping Links)

My Favourite Autumn Outfits (With AW17 Shopping Links) | Not Dressed As Lamb

We're already approaching mid-September which is frightening - how about we put a positive spin on it and get some autumn outfit inspiration from last year's posts?

Many of you may know that I dread the end of the summer, but as with the cold-to-warm season change over I do look forward to switching over my clothes in storage. However as we really had summer for only about three (two?) weeks here in the UK, I'll admit that I didn't even get half of my summer clothes out this year. They're still sat there in boxes, waiting to be unpacked... it's kind of depressing.

So in celebration of September - and in my regular quarterly round up of my seasonal looks - here are my favourite autumn outfits from last year, but with the added bonus of AW17 shopping links for you to recreate the looks. Let's think positively about autumn (I know most of you reading don't need to be told that, I'm really just giving myself a pep talk), shall we...?!

Hopefully you'll find something that you like and can work into your wardrobe - all are suitable for smart casual occasions, and some would work well in an office environment where there's a relaxed dress code.
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Monday, 11 September 2017

A Multicoloured Stripe Sweater in My "Wrong" Colours #iwillwearwhatilike

Bright autumnal outfit: Multi-coloured stripe sweater with fluted sleeves \ grey peg trousers \ pink suede block heel fringed shoes \ pink Cambridge Satchel Co Cloud satchel | Not Dressed As Lamb, over 40 style

On Friday I talked about wearing things we're not "supposed" to wear - in other words, items or outfits that are not deemed flattering to our own particular body shape, or patterns that are wrong for us, or colours that don't suit us... le sigh.

So in the true spirit of the #iwillwearwhatilike link up, I thought I'd feature my new, fantastic multicoloured stripe sweater from Asos. That has big fluted sleeves. And has stripes in all the colours I'm not meant to wear with my colouring.

You've probably noticed I tend to wear a lot of orange. And peach. And yellow. And khaki. And coral. And all the lovely rich warm (what you'd call) autumnal colours. But hey, I was attracted to this sweater in all its pink, lavender, sky blue, mint, grey-blue and black "cold" colour glory. I ordered it despite me knowing it wasn't made up of any of the colours that I know suit me so well, but you know what? I loved it anyway, and thought What the hell, I'll just try it.

OF COURSE IF I DIDN'T LIKE HOW IT LOOKED ON ME THAT'S A WHOLE DIFFERENT BALL GAME, BUT JUST BECAUSE IT DOESN'T FALL IN MY AUTUMN/WARM/WHATEVER COLOUR CHART THEN WHY SHOULDN'T I WEAR IT, I SAY. 

And of course I ended up loving it. Not only that, but when I wore it I received so many compliments about it, like Oh, what a lovely happy jumper! - isn't that the main thing? That it made me feel happy in it, and I loved the colours anyway?

This one in orange, brown and yellow is much more what I "should" be wearing, but where's the fun in wearing what we ought to be wearing, and not what we fell in love with? Of course if I didn't like how it looked on me that's a whole different ball game, but just because it doesn't fall in my autumn/warm/whatever colour chart then why shouldn't I wear it, I say.
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Friday, 8 September 2017

Why is the Way We Look to OTHERS More Important Than How We FEEL We Look? #SaturdayShareLinkUp

Why is the Way We LOOK to Others More Important Than How We FEEL We Look

I have no idea how or why this idea popped in my head this week - I think it came to me in a flash of inspiration when I was idly watching or reading something online. Since WHEN did the way we appear to others become more important than the way we feel about how we look?

When eureka moments like that strike me, I tend to run to my phone (who am I kidding - as if my phone would EVER be running distance away from me... like every good blogger, it rarely leaves my grubby little Instagramming paws) and scribble it down in my Notes app.

Then it means I have something to babble on about on a Friday night for the Saturday Share post - aaaand (as they say) Bob's your uncle. But I usually remember what event or article triggered my thoughts about a certain subject - not this time.

So we shall assume it came to me in an inspiring flash of rose gold and pink sparkly unicorn-delivered inspiration... isn't that how all good bloggers start their day and get their material? No?!

Having said that, I have since scrolled down my notes and seen that I made a note of what made me think this after all. However, I enjoyed my unicorn flavour spiel just now, so in it stays.

Like the Ronnie Corbett telling stories from his chair sketches, I DIGRESS.

You must wear "what suits you"

Here's the thing: Who says we have to wear what suits us (who says it suits us)? Why do we have to wear things that flatter us, or are "right" for our body shapes?

This week I've been editing photos for Monday's #iwillwearwhatilike (how apt!) post, and I'm wearing something in colours that I've recently come to realise are not "my" colours. (See, I've completely remembered why I was thinking about this topic now).

From editing countless pictures of me for six years, I've some to realise that the colours I tend to wear the most are warm colours - orange-red, tangerine, peach, coral, mustard yellow, khaki, warm pinks, etc. I know for a fact that blue-pink lipsticks look somewhat dreadful on me, and I realised (not that long ago) that it was because warm-toned colours are more flattering to my skin tone. So I can wear red lipstick, but it must be coral-red or orangey-red.

So I've usually turned down offers to have my colours read (assessed?) because I can tell what I like from photos all too easily.

The big but is - I love them anyway. I love just about all colours. The only two colours I almost never wear are purple and cobalt blue, and even then I own a purple t-shirt and one of my favourite pairs of trousers are my bright blue carrot-shaped pants.

Why then do I have to only wear colours that suit me - what if I just really, really like them? And what if wearing those colours makes me happy? Will it offend others if my complexion isn't quite as rosy as it could be if I were to choose, say, a warm peach or a sunshine yellow?

In other words - Why am I dressing solely for others (because once I'm out and about I can't see me anymore). I'm just feeling happy in my not-right-for-me cobalt blue and cold pink. Who gives a stuff whether the colour "isn't doing anything for my face"... I certainly don't.

WE ARE FOREVER HAVING IT DRUMMED INTO US THAT WE MUST WEAR WHAT FLATTERS US. IN OTHER WORDS, NOT A SHAPELESS SHIFT DRESS IN A BOLD FLORAL PRINT WITH A HEMLINE THAT STOPS AT THE WIDEST PART OF YOUR CALF. .. OOPS.

The same can be applied for shapes or silhouettes that aren't supposed to be worn by people who have a certain shape: We are forever having it drummed into us that we MUST wear what flatters us. In other words, not a shapeless shift dress in a bold floral print with a hemline that stops at the widest part of your calf... oops. That's not what's recommended for my hourglass shape.

If Style Rules are to be adhered to, I 'should' be dressing my hourglass shape in v-neck tops (not too voluminous) and pencil skirts. I shouldn't be wearing dresses with a high neckline and ruffles, no siree. Guess what? I look, for want of a better expression, bloody DREADFUL in pencil skirts. They just don't suit me at all - at least, I don't think they suit me. They don't suit my personality and I don't feel like myself wearing them.

Not Dressed As Lamb - CLICK HERE to receive posts by email

So if YOU don't like wearing something because you don't feel good in it, don't wear it. And if you DO like something and want to wear it even though it's not what you "should" be wearing for your colouring or your shape, stop and think to yourself:

Does this item/outfit make me happy? Am I comfortable wearing it?

Yes to both and that's all that really matters - that way you feel is WAY more important than how you look to others. Come back on Monday for my Not My Colours outfit and tell me what you think... do I look happy wearing the colours?!

DO YOU THROW CAUTION TO THE WIND AND WEAR WHAT YOU LOVE, REGARDLESS OF WHETHER IT'S THE "RIGHT" COLOUR OR SHAPE FOR YOU? TELL ME IN THE COMMENTS OR TWEET ME @NOTLAMB!

If you liked this, please pin it!

Why is the Way We LOOK to Others More Important Than How We FEEL We Look? | Not Dressed As Lamb

So all that's left to say is - I've shared my thoughts/stories/tuppence-worth this week, now it's time to share yours... LET'S GET THIS [LINK UP] PARTY STARTED!

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .



Thank you for joining the #SaturdayShareLinkUp! Designed to allow you to share anything you like on ANY topic, it goes live every Friday at around 8pm UK time and will stay open for a week. You can share blog posts or Instagram posts, old posts or new posts, and link up as many as you like.

PLEASE be kind and leave a link somewhere on your post, and share your post using the hashtag #SaturdayShareLinkUp - if you tweet your link with the hashtag and tag me in @notlamb I'll even retweet it to my followers for you :)

A hot tip for linking up:

Use clear, bright images (crop in close if necessary) and add a relevant, descriptive title (you've got 75 characters to use). These sorts of thumbnails and text always get the most clicks, so don't waste the opportunity to increase traffic and engagement on your best work!




Catherine

LIKE THIS POST? YOU MIGHT ALSO WANT TO READ...


Linking up to: Brilliant Blog Posts, Fake It Until You Make It
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Thursday, 7 September 2017

6 Easy Ways to Improve Your Blog Outfit Photos (Part 2: Editing Tips)

6 Easy Ways to Improve Your Blog Photos (Part 2: Editing Tips)

After having published part one of this two-part post where I discussed shooting tips for improving your blog photos, the time has come to talk editing. Post production is just as much of an important part of the process - here's all you need to know!

A lot of great photos - great for their composition, lighting, backgrounds and so on - are ruined due to their lack of attention... in the darkroom. That's what I REALLY want to say, having studied for a photography degree long before the days of digital you get used to saying certain things. As I mentioned in the last photo tips post, old habits die hard.

But here's the thing: Digital photography is designed to require attention in the darkroom in post production. I think a lot of people consider tweaking images "cheating". There is a huge difference between using Photoshop to alter our appearance (giving us slimmer hips, longer legs, etc.) and using it to enhance the image. Photography is not just about what someone looks like in a photograph: It's about light. It's about shadow. It's about colour. It's about composition. It's about creating mood.

It's about telling a story - and blogging is no different.
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Wednesday, 6 September 2017

Styling a Velvet Midi Dress to Take You From Desk to Dinner | Hobbs AW17 by the Over40Collective

Desk to dinner outfit: One dress styled two ways | A Hobbs yellow ochre velvet midi dress with ruffles styled as office workwear and a date night outfit

I have another ways to wear post for you: Following Monday's Breton tops I'm now styling up one dress two ways... A desk to dinner outfit, anyone?

This absolute beauty of a midi dress is my first velvet piece since the fabric came back into fashion after it was THE fabric to wear in the 90s. When it first made a reappearance a couple of years ago my initial reaction was Ewwww no... but as with all trends that come back, I usually end up liking them again - eventually.

My first thoughts though went to velvet in the very 90s colours of purple or dark green, and back then it was mostly crushed velvet (not a great combination, and hence my hesitation to warm to the trend). Neither of those colours "do it" for me now - so it wasn't until I saw Michelle of RetroChicMama in a dream of a blush velvet dress that I started to warm to it - and now this velvet midi dress in a stunning yellow ochre colour has made me fall head over heels in love with the fabric all over again.

The dress was very kindly gifted to me by Hobbs as part of a self-generated campaign by the Over40Collective: Autumn is pretty much now upon us (let's just forget our lousy summer, shall we?), and I'm ready to embrace it with open arms - despite being a die-hard summer lover. No point mourning over something we never had, eh?

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Monday, 4 September 2017

3 Modern Ways to Wear a Classic Stripe Breton Top #iwillwearwhatilike

3 creative ways to style a Breton stripe top: Office chic/workwear, casual weekend wear and date night outfit | Not Dressed As Lamb, over 40 style
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Like many women, I am somewhat obsessed by the Breton top. It's an absolute classic - a garment that's synonymous with Audrey Hepburn and French style in general is always going to be stylish.

However, like many classic items, you see them styled the same way over and over... We all want a little inspiration when it comes to styling the staples in our wardrobes, don't we?

As I'm working with Seasalt this year - a brand that excels in striped sailor tops - I thought I'd show you a few alternative ways to style your Breton stripes: Not a trench coat in sight, in other words (that would be too easy, and too easy just isn't my style as you probably know)!

When I started writing this post I did wonder who exactly designed it and what the Brittany connection was. There are some pretty interesting facts I didn't know about the history of the Breton top. For example, did you know...

  • The top is called a Breton shirt because many sailors were from Brittany - a marinière (sailor) top was worn by quartermasters and seamen in the French Navy. It was originally made of tightly knit wool to protect them from the elements.
  • In 1858, the combed cotton jersey and sweaters officially became part of the French naval uniform, with strict specifications about the number of stripes and their size (it's said they represented the number of Napoleon's victories).
  • It was said that stripes made it easier to see sailors who had fallen into the sea.
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Friday, 1 September 2017

An Amusing Look Back at My Old Instagram Posts #SaturdayShareLinkUp

Instagram Before and Afters: An Amusing Look Back at My Old Instagram Posts

This week I watched a great vlog from James Nord, the founder of blogging outreach programme Fohr Card, in which he talked about whether bloggers should delete old Instagram posts.

His advice was No, you shouldn't (in terms of it being unnecessary and, I can see, a waste of time for no actual gain). In other words, it won't harm your brand to have not-great quality Instagram images from years ago because to be honest, who's going to sit and scroll through several years' worth of Instagram posts? Definitely not brands, and that's the only reason why you may be worried about what might be seen on (or associated with) your account.

Obviously if you have posts that are either embarrassing, bad taste or politically incorrect then yes, take them down. But poorer quality than what you're showing now... who cares?! Plus, it shows just how far you've come and how much your photography has improved. Leave them, I say.

I THOUGHT I'D SHOW YOU SOME OF MY EARLY INSTAGRAM PHOTOS FOR A GIGGLE - AND TO PROVE THAT EVEN SOMEONE WITH A PHOTOGRAPHY DEGREE HAD A PRETTY POOR FEED IN THE EARLY DAYS. 


So in the spirit of sharing something every Friday for the #SaturdayShareLinkUp, I thought I'd scroll right back and show you some of my early Instagram photos for a giggle - and to prove that even someone with a photography degree had a pretty poor feed in the early days.
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